Spirit of Tasmania

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Spirit of Tasmainia
Spirit of Tasmainia
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(3-15)
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Spirit of Tasmainia
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SPRING GETAWAY

$74 Spring Getaway
Start planning your Spring Getaway with Spirit of Tasmania!

About the ship

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Spirit of TasmaniawhiteSpirit of Tasmania I and Spirit of Tasmania II were built in 1998 by Kvaerner Masa-Yards in Finland. They have a displacement weight of almost 30,000 tonnes and a length of 194.3 metres.

Spirit of Tasmania I and Spirit of Tasmania II cross Bass Strait at a cruising speed of 27 knots which is the equivalent of 50 kilometres per hour. The 429 kilometre voyage across Bass Strait is roughly twice the distance by road between Devonport and Strahan, on Tasmania's west coast.

Stretched end-to-end, the vehicle lanes on each ship would be almost two kilometres long!

QUICK FACTSSpirit of Tasmania I and
Spirit of Tasmania II
Operator TT-Line Company Pty Ltd
Builder Kvaerner Masa-Yards of Finland
Year built 1998
Ship type Roll On/Roll Off passenger and freight vessel
Class American Bureau of Shipping
Overall length 194.3m
Overall width 25.0m
Gross tonnage 29,338 tonne
First commercial crossing 1 September 2002
Average speed 27 knots
Crossing time 9-11 hours (approx)
Total berths 748
Number of cabins (all with bathroom facilities) 222
Number of Ocean Recliners 146
Vehicle lane metres 2,565 metres
Distance from port to port 232 nautical miles (429 kilometres)
Distance from head to head 190 nautical miles (352 kilometres)
Distance from Station Pier to head 42 nautical miles (77 kilometres)

Note: A knot equals 1 nautical mile per hour. A nautical mile equals 6080 feet, 1852 metres or 1.85 kilometres.

 

Spirit of Tasmania I at dry dock

Ever wanted to see the bottom of a ship? Ever wanted to see propellers and anchors close up? See Spirit of Tasmania I like you've never seen it before - in dry dock, Sydney 2013.

Spirit of Tasmainia